Everywhere Fare Dauntless Jaunter Combined LogoI am always interested in learning about the culture and the traditions of the people in the places that I travel to; I enjoy experiencing the real-life day-to-day tasks that these people do and the foods that they eat. Some of my favorite souvenirs to collect when I’m abroad are original recipes of some of the authentic foods I might have tried. I have been collecting them for a little while now, and I wanted to share them with similar travelers who are interested, but I didn’t want to turn this site into a recipe database. Thus, we’ve begun on our new venture: Everywhere Fare.

There are a trillion and one recipe sites and blogs, but what we had in mind might be a bit different. Basically, we only wanted to include recipes on the traditional foods from different cuisines around the world. This might not sound groundbreaking, but we won’t include recipes for chicken pot-pie, because there are so many mutations and variations involved, unless we can find the original recipe that started all chicken pot-pies. Likewise, we don’t want to change the recipe, even if it is in anyway offensive or off-putting; if some soup calls for a base of turkey blood, we will try not to give alternatives as these possibly bastardize the real recipe. No doubt it would change the flavor. I am sure that many people would assume that this would not be such a great recipe-sharing site. However, we simply want to document these things we find, whether they seem weird or offensive to our palate.

The site is still quite a baby, even more than this one. We envision a site where users will be able to search by specific cuisines in locations, rather than just Asian or BBQ. Each country is proud of its own menu, and most of the time would be quick to point out differences between theirs and their neighbors, though they may be grouped together. Also, we would like to further distinguish between regional variations of cuisines in a country. Many countries are just too big or too diverse to label every food within its borders as that country’s cuisine. In Italian cuisine, there is Sicilian, Neapolitan, Tuscan, Lombard, and many other cuisines. Perhaps you could just call it all Italian, but wouldn’t it be better to understand the differences? Not only will we be better off with the knowledge, but we will be sure not to offend when visiting.

Everywhere Fare is still barely past its conception, and we would appreciate any feedback that you may have, whether it be positive or negative, critical or a suggestion. Hope you enjoy!

Comment! Complain! Come On! Please?